So it took me forever to watch show. Honestly I wish I hadn’t watch it just so I could see it again with new eyes. For those who don’t know what I am talking about is the show about, ah, the cosmos. Its first season was shoot in 1980 and had Carl Sagan as host. In 2014 Neil deGrasse Tyson took Sagan’s stage of the second season of the show.

The show talks in scientific facts why we need new habits. If that wasn’t enough already it also explains all your physics teacher tried to back in high school, but didn’t quite do it – at least that’s my case. The show was made for both children and adults – I guess I can tell because I am right in the middle. It is full with beautiful animations that illustrate our planet, solar system, galaxy and universe.

It also presents us the biggest scientists, philosophers and researches we never heard of. All in cartoons and with a great storyline. There is no way of not learning with Neil deGrasse’s clear and simple explanations about complex subjects as why lead is toxic to humans and how the human species got to calculate the precise of age by measuring its presence in our atmosphere. Or even how supernovas occur and how some of them can end up becoming a blackhole.

The show has 13 episodes, with 50 minutes each. Precious time of your life that you won’t be wasting by watching it. If you don’t believe me you may believe all the 9 awards the show got, one of them the Peabody Award, which recognises distinguished and meritorious public service by American radio and TV broadcasters, networks, online media, producing organisations, and individuals. Yes it is considered a public service. Plus its 4 Emmy’s, 2 critic’s choice television awards. Recognising not only the information but also the writing, music, host and producer – Seth MacFarlane, the same guy from Family Guy, American Dad and Ted. The coolest part? It’s on Netflix!

If I didn’t gave you enough reason to watch it, or you simply don’t have any time please watch this part of the first season, which also features the second one. It’s called Pale Blue Dot by Carl Sagan. It will definitely put things in perspective.